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© 2017 Language Analytics LLC
Build 5527 – 11/4/2017
Type it the way you say it.

You can also use these optional shortcuts (case sensitive).

ع3قQ/8/9اaa/A
ء2كKوoo/w
ح7/HطT/6يy/ee
خ5/7’/khظZ/6′ذDH/dh
غgh/gu/3′صS/9ثTH/th
ضD/9′

You can also use a dash (“-“) to group words together.
Example:

kal-aghani → كالأغاني

For more help, try our tutorial .

Arabic Alphabet , Arabic Letters

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Lesson (2): The Arabic Alphabet (Writing Letters)

It is used by many to begin any Language by teaching its Parts of Speech; however, logically it is better to begin our trip by teaching the Arabic Alphabet (Arabic Letters) as it is the reasonable starting point. Consider the absence of Alphabets then how we can form words and/or sentences?!

Arabic Alphabet Chart [29]

pronunciationTransliteratedIsolatedIsolatedpronunciationInitialMedialFinalTranscription
أَلِف̛ālifاأLike A in Appleاـاـاā
بَاءbā̛ببLike B in Babyبــبــبb
تَاءtā̛تتLike T in Treeتــتــت ـةt
ثَاءthā̛ثثLike the Th in Theoryثــثــثth
جِيمjimججSometimes like the G in Girl or like the J in Jarجــجــجj
حَاءhā̛ححLike the h in he yet light in pronunciationحــحــحh
خَاءkhā̛خخLike the Ch in the name Bachخــخــخkh
دَالdālددLike the D in Dadدـدـدd
ذَالzālذذLike the Th in Theذـذـذz
رَاءrā̛ررLike the R in Ramرـرـرr
زَايzāyززLike the Z in zooزـزـزz
سِينsinسسLike the S in Seeســســسs
شِينshinششLike the Sh in Sheشــشــشsh
صَادsādصصLike the S in Sad yet heavy in pronunciationصــصــصs
ضَادdādضضLike the D in Dead yet heavy in pronunciationضــضــضd
طَاءtā̛ططLike the T in Table yet heavy in pronunciationطــطــطt
ظَاءẓā̛ظظLike the Z in Zorro yet heavy in pronunciationظــظــظ
عَينٍعainععHas no real equivalent sometimes they replace its sound with the A sound like for example the name Ali for علي /عali/عــعــعع̛
غَينghainغغLike the Gh in Ghandiغــغــغgh
فَاءfā̛ففLike the F in Foolفــفــفf
قَافqāfققLike the Q in Queen yet heavy velar sound in pronunciationقــقــقq
كَافkāfككLike the K in Kateكــكــكk
لاَمlāmفلLike the L in Loveلــلــلl
مِيمmimممLike the M in Moonمــمــمm
نُونnunننLike the N in Noonنــنــنn
هَاءhā̛ه هـهLike the H in Heهــهــهh
وَاوwāw,وLike the W in the reaction of astonishment saying: WAW!ـو—-ـوW(aw, au, u)
يَاءyā̛ييLike the Y in youيــيــيY (ay, ai, ῑ)
هَمزَةhamzaء

أُ
إِ

أَ

Seen latter because it differs according to case and contextLatter will be discussed separatelyأ ؤـئـئ̛

Now, you can deduce from the herein above Chart that Arabic letters are 29 with the letter hamza, sometimes is regarded as a separate Letter. Further, in the first column above, you can see some dashes or symbols on the Arabic Letter above or below them; they are called Arabic vowels (Described later).

Consider the following three Arabic Letters Characteristics:
a- Letters are connected to form words.
b- Words have vowels on it (described later).
c- Some letters have dots on it.

Do you know that:
1- Arabic structure is different in Alphabet from any other Language.
2- Arabic letters form words by connecting them together.
3- Arabic Alphabet is written and read from right to left.
4- Arabic Letters’ writing has three forms: initial, medial, and final i.e. different in shape according to their position.
5- Letters in isolation and final are mostly the same in shape.
6- Letters in the initial and medial positions are mostly the same in shape.
7- There are many print forms, types of fonts and writing forms for Arabic; yet most common of which is /̛ān-naskh/ (normal writing) النَسخ and /̛ār-ruqعa/ الرِقعة. An elementary/ intermediate Reader/ Learner is advised to use /̛ān-naskh/ writing form.
8- You can find the correct pronunciation in Arabic just from the spelling of the word which is considered a no-trouble-trick of Arabic pronunciation.
9- Arabic Letters can be divided into two groups according to their position

1st Group
– Can’t be joined on the left side.
– Can be joined to a preceding letter but never to a following one.
– Then, all Arabic Letters in the Alphabet could be connected from both sides except the following mentioned Letters.(see table below)

2nd Group
– Change shape according to their position in the word.

1st Group (Non-Connecting Letters)1st Group Examples2nd Group (Connecting Letters)2nd Group Examples
ālif اسَمَاء
/samā̛/
for “sky”
عain   عRefer to the three Arabic Letters’ Writing Forms (initial – medial – final)
Dāl دالدَهر
/̛ād-dahr/
for “past life”
ghain غRefer to the three Arabic Letters’ Writing Forms (initial – medial – final)
zāl ذالذَهب
/̛āz-zahab/
For “gold”
kāf كRefer to the three Arabic Letters’ Writing Forms (initial – medial – final)
rā̛ رالرَمَادِي
/̛ā̛r-ramādy/
for “grey color”
hā̛ ه هـRefer to the three Arabic Letters’ Writing Forms (initial – medial – final)
zāy زالزَمَان
/̛āz-zamān/
For “past”
yā̛ يRefer to the three Arabic Letters’ Writing Forms (initial – medial – final)
wāw والوَطَن
/̛āl-watan/
for “homeland”
hamza
ء
أُ
إِ
أَ
Refer to the three Arabic Letters’ Writing Forms (initial – medial – final).
NB: this letter will be discussed later

10- Few Arabic Written Letters could be only differentiated by their dots :

bā̛    ب
tā̛    ت
thā̛    ث
jim    ج
hā̛    ح
khā̛   خ
dāl    د
Zāl    ذ
rā̛    ر
Zāy    ز
sin    س
shin    ش
sād    ص
dād    ض
tā̛    ط
ẓā̛   ظ
عain    ع
ghain    غ
fā̛    ف
qāf    ق
nun    ن

11- There are Confusing Arabic Written Letters phonetically-wise:

Light Sound in PronunciationHeavy Sound in Pronunciation
tā̛    تtā̛   ط
Dāl    دdād    ض
zāl    ذẓā̛    ظ
sin    س sād   ص
Kāf    كqāf    ق

12- The Letter tā̛ ت; sometimes it is written like the letter hā̛ in its final form ـهyet with two dots above it ـة. This letter is mostly seen in its final position to indicate a feminine gender ending and is termed ” tā̛ Marbutah”.

13- The Letters fā̛ and qāf in Moroccan Written Arabic are different in their shape as seen below:

Position in wordIsolatedInitialMedialFinal
Form of the letter fā̛ in Moroccan Arabicڢڢــڢــڢ
Form of the letter qāf in Moroccan Arabicڡڧــڧــڡ

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Numbers for letters when writing Arabic in English


August 10th, 2013

1 comment

This is another one of those frequently asked questions that we get emailed to our inbox. Fortunately, the answer is quite simple and straightforward.

We simply use numbers when writing on English keyboards to represent certain Arabic letters that have no equivalent sounds in English. The examples below should clarify the matter.

The Arabic letter ح is represented by the number 7. Even though this particular Arabic letter sounds close to the English letter ‘H’, it would be deceiving for the letter ‘H’ to represent it. ‘H’ actually represents the Arabic letter ه which has the same pronunciation.

حبيب is therefore written on English keyboards as 7abeeb, if you saw it written as ‘habeeb’ and took that pronunciation literally as it was written, it would be incorrect.

The arabic letter ع has absolutely no equivalent pronunciation sound in the English alphabet, therefore we use the number 3 to represent it. For example, the Arabic word for ‘eye’ is عَين, and this is written as ‘3ayn’ using an English keyboard.

‘3’ represents ع
‘a’ represents the short vowel Fat7a that lies on the ع
‘y’ represents ي
and ‘n’ represents ن

The following chart shows the mapping between the Latin script and Arabic. It is included in every transcript accompanied with the podcasts.

Arabic chat alphabet

We highly recommend you try the Arabic Pronunciation Guide . This is a web based app that we developed to help you with the pronunciation of all the Arabic letters and numbers. It also shows the mappings between Latin and Arabic. (Requires Premium Subscription)

Further useful reading on the Arabic Chat Alphabet can be found on Wikipedia here

1 Comment



brookela says
Tue 8th Oct 13@06:19 pm

Incredibly useful, shokran ya 7abibi!
Join the Discussion
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or Register ( Why register? )

Numbers for letters when writing Arabic in English

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كزبرة

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Coriander

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  • Home
  • Lessons
  • Articles
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  • Dictionary
  • Activities
  • Forum
  • Blog
  • About us

Numbers for letters when writing Arabic in English


August 10th, 2013

1 comment

This is another one of those frequently asked questions that we get emailed to our inbox. Fortunately, the answer is quite simple and straightforward.

We simply use numbers when writing on English keyboards to represent certain Arabic letters that have no equivalent sounds in English. The examples below should clarify the matter.

The Arabic letter ح is represented by the number 7. Even though this particular Arabic letter sounds close to the English letter ‘H’, it would be deceiving for the letter ‘H’ to represent it. ‘H’ actually represents the Arabic letter ه which has the same pronunciation.

حبيب is therefore written on English keyboards as 7abeeb, if you saw it written as ‘habeeb’ and took that pronunciation literally as it was written, it would be incorrect.

The arabic letter ع has absolutely no equivalent pronunciation sound in the English alphabet, therefore we use the number 3 to represent it. For example, the Arabic word for ‘eye’ is عَين, and this is written as ‘3ayn’ using an English keyboard.

‘3’ represents ع
‘a’ represents the short vowel Fat7a that lies on the ع
‘y’ represents ي
and ‘n’ represents ن

The following chart shows the mapping between the Latin script and Arabic. It is included in every transcript accompanied with the podcasts.

Arabic chat alphabet

We highly recommend you try the Arabic Pronunciation Guide . This is a web based app that we developed to help you with the pronunciation of all the Arabic letters and numbers. It also shows the mappings between Latin and Arabic. (Requires Premium Subscription)

Further useful reading on the Arabic Chat Alphabet can be found on Wikipedia here

1 Comment



brookela says
Tue 8th Oct 13@06:19 pm

Incredibly useful, shokran ya 7abibi!
Join the Discussion
Sign in to leave a comment

or Register ( Why register? )

Numbers for letters when writing Arabic in English

Random Word

كزبرة

Show Translation
Coriander

Advertisement

Copyright © 2007-2018 ArabicPod.net. All rights reserved